April 28, 1805
John Ordway

clear and pleasant.   one of the Men caught a large beaver last night.    we Set off eairly.   the wind had Shifted to S.E. and blew gently so that we Sailed Some part of the time.   proceeded on passed high bluffs on N.S. of a whiteish coulor    rough hills and knobs on each Side.  Some Smoth bottoms of cottonwood on each Side of the River.  Saw alrge flocks of Cabberrie or antilope which is a Specie of the Goat kind, on the Sides of the hills on S.S.   Saw Some dead on the edge of the river, which I Suppose the wolves had killed.   Capt. Clark and our Intrepter walked on shore on the S.S.   we proceeded on untill abt. 3 oClock.   came to where Capt. Clark had made a fire.    we then halted to dine in a bottom above high bluffs on S.S. Capt Clark had killed one deer & a goose.   he Saw Several bair    proceeded on    towards evening we Saw a large black bair Swimming the River  we went on Shore to head him in hopes to kill him.   one man Shot & wounded it but it ran in to thick bushes So that we could not find it.  Some of the party Saw Several more bair on the hills, on S.S. the bluffs make neare the river all this day and are verry Steep in some places & other places high & rough Some of which are White Stone and Clay, others are of a redish coulour, nearly like brick.   we Camped [Near Otis Creek on the opposite side.] in a handsom bottom of c.w. timber on N.S. high steep bluffs on S.S.  Came 24 miles this day.--

April 28, 1805
Patrick Gass

We set out early, had a fine day and went on very well.  About 9 we halted for breakfast under very high bluffs on the North side.  About 15 miles above the Yellow Stone river, the banks o the Missouri are not so high as below it, and the sand bars are more in the middle of the river.  We came 24 miles and encamped on the North side in a handsome bottom.  The bottoms here are not so large, and have less timber on them than those below the Jaune.

April 28, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

This day we had fine clear weather & pleasant, we set out Early in the morning; and proceeded on till 9 o'Clock A.M. when we stopped to break fast, under a high bluff lying on the South side of the River, about 15 Miles, above the Mouth of the River Roshjone, We found that the banks of the River Mesouri, was not so high, as it was lower down this River; and that the Sand barrs, lay generally in the middle of this River; The land as we passed along, appears to lay more level than what we had passed for several days past, but very Rich & fertile   We encamped in the Evening, in a handsome bottom, on which there was Cotton wood Trees growing.--  The bottoms are not so large in general here, as bleow, and the Timber not so plenty.--  We came 24 Miles this day & the place we encamp'd on <lies> lay on the South side of the River Mesouri.-- [As apparently was often the case both Ordway and Gass disagree with Whitehouse as to which side of the river they camped.]