May 02, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

... snow ... being about one inch deep, ... the flesh of the beaver is esteemed a delecacy among us; I think the tale a most delicious morsal, when boiled it resembles in flavor the fresh tongues and sounds of the codfish, and is usually sufficiently large to afford a plentifull meal for two men.

every thing which is incomprehensible to the indians they call big medicine, and is the opperation of the presnts [presence -- Ed.] and power of the great sperit. this morning one of the men shot the indian dog that had followed us for several days, he would steal their cooked provision.

May 02, 1805
William Clark

... a verry extraodernarey climate, to behold the trees Green & flowers spred on the plain, & Snow an inch deep.

May 02, 1805
John Ordway

at day light it began Snowing & continued Snowing & blowing so that we did not Set off.  Some of the party went out a hunting.   they killed Some buffaloe & Deer, & found Several pieces of red cloath at one old Indian camp that we expect they left their as a Sacrifice as that is their form of worship, as they have /Some knowledge of the Supreme being, and any thing above their comprehension they Call Big Medisine-- &.c.   about 3 oClock it left off Snowing.   the wind Shifted in to the West.   we Set off & proceeded on.   the Snow lay on the edge of the Sand bars & Sand beaches where the wind had blew it up one foot deep, but on the hills it was not more than half an Inch deep.  Capt. Clark & one of the hunters [Drouillard.] Shot 3 beaver in the edge of the River s.s.    the air & wind verry cold.   we Camped at a handsom bottom on the N.S. [Near the crossing of Montana Highway 251.] which is a very large bottom part c.w. timber & part prarie    high plains back from the River.  Came only abt. 5 miles to day.

May 02, 1805
Patrick Gass

At day break it began to snow; and the wind continued so high, we could not proceed until the afternoon.  While we lay here our hunters went out and killed some buffaloe and deer.  They found some red cloth at an old Indian camp, which we supposed had been offered and left as a sacrifice; the Indians having some knowledge of a supreme being and this their mode of worship.  The snow did not fall more than an inch deep.   at four we set out, went six miles, and encamped on the North side of a beautiful bottom.

May 02, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

at day light it began to Snow & blow So that we did not Set off this morning.   Some men went out to hunt.  Killed Some buffaloe & Some Deer.  One of the party killd two beaver last night.  the men who was out a hunting found Several peaces of red cloath at an Indian camp, where we expect they left last winter for a Sacrifice to their maker as that is their form of worship, as they have Some knowledge of the Supreme being, and anything above their comprihention they call big medicine.    about 3 oC the wind abated & quit Snowing.   we Set off.    proceeded on.   the [wind] had shifted & blew from the west.   the Snow lay on the Edge of the Sand beaches where the wind blew it against the bank about 12 Inches Deep but their was not more than about one Inch on a level.  Capt Clark & one of the party [Drouillard] Shot 3 beaver on the South Shore.   the air verry cold.   we Camped on the N.S. at a handsom bottom partly covered with timber.   came mes. 5 miles to day.

May 02, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

At day light this morning it began to Snow <with> & we had a hard Wind, we lay by the fore part of the day, some of our party went out to hunt, they killed some Buffalo Calves, and Deer; and caught some Beaver in their Traps, which they brought to our Camp, The hunting party found several pieces of red Cloth, at an Indian Camp; which we expect the Indians had left there, the last winter, as a Sacrafice to their maker, the Indian woman mention'd is the custom when they break up their encampment, & which shows that they have some knowledge of the supreme being, The Indians generally call every thing beyond their comprehension Medecine; and are fearfull of it.--  This we learnt from the Indians at the Mandan Villages.--  about 3 o'Clock P.M the Wind abated, and it quitted snowing.--  We sett off, and proceeded on our Voyage--the wind having shifted to the Westward, and the snow laying on the Sand Bars edge, (where the wind blew the snow against the bank,) and it, lay 12 Inches deep <it> but was not <being> more than one Inch on the level ground.--  As we proceeded on our way.   Captain Clark and one of the prty shot 3 Beaver on the South shore.  The Air was cold during the whole of this day.  In the Evening we encamped on the North side of the River; in a bottom nearly covered with Timber.