May 28, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

... a few drops of rain again fell and were attended with distant thunder which is the first we have heared since we left the Mandans. ... One of the party saw a very large bear today but being some distance from the river and no timber to conceal him he did not think proper to fire on him.

May 28, 1805
William Clark

... picked up on the shore a pole which had been made use of by the nativs for lodge poles, ... it is new and is a certain sign of the Indians being on the river above a foot ball and several other articles are also found to substantiate this opinion. ...

... camped imedeately opposit to a small creek ... we call Bull Creek from the circumstance of a Buffalow Bull swimming from the opposit side and comeing out of the river imedeately across one of the Perogues without sinking or injureing any thing in the Perogue, and passing with great violence thro' our camp in the night makeing 3 angles without hurting a man, altho they lay in every direction, and it was very dark

May 28, 1805
John Ordway

a cloudy morning.  Some fiew drops of rain & Smokey wind from the S.W.    we Set out at an eairly hour.   the Shoaley places are verry numerous & Some bad to git around.   we have to make use of the cords & poles, our cords are all except one made of Elk Skin & Stretch & Some time brake which indanger the Pirogues or canoe, as it immediately turns and if any rock Should chance to be below the rapidity of the water would turn hir over if Should Strike, we observe great caution at these places. Capt. Clark walked on Shore, found the country ruged and as described yesterday.   he saw great nombers of the Big hornned animels, one of which he killed    their faun are nearly half grown.    one of the party saw a verry large bear.   we picked up a pole on the Shore which has been made use of by the natives for a lodge pole & halled by dogs & it is new & a certain Sign of the Indians being on the River above     a foot ball & Several other articles are also found to Substantiate this oppinion.   at 1 oClock we had a fiew drops of rain & Some Thunder which is the first Thunder we have had Since we Set out, from Fort Mandans, at 10 miles the river the hills begin to widen & the river Spreads and is crouded with Islands, the bottoms contain some Scatering cottonwood the Islands also contain timber.    passed a creek [Thompson's Creek after expedition member John B. Thompson, now Birch Creek.] of running water on the Stard. Side about 35 yards wide, and Camped imediately opposite to a Small Creek [Bull Creek to the expedition, now Dog Creek.] on Lard. Side.  Came 21 miles to day.--

May 28, 1805
Patrick Gass

We set sail early, had a fine morning, and proceeded on through this desert country untill about 4 o'clock P.M. when we came to a more pleasant part.  We made twenty-one miles and encamped on the North side.

May 28, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a clear pleasant morning.   we Set off and proceeded on.   passed over hard riffles.   the Bluffs & clifts are high [illegible]   as yesterday.   abt 10 oC. Capt. Clark killed a mountain Sheep & [illegible] Deer.   about noon we halted to dine near Some old Indian Camps.  Some thunder & Small showers of rain which lasted about 2 hours.   we then proceeded on    a pleasant afternoon.   towards evening the hills began to git lower    passed large bottoms, partly covered with c. wood timber.   passed Several Islands 7 or 8 in the course of the day, Some of them handsom groves of timber on them.   we passed a nomber of large Creeks on each Side of the river [Thompson's Creek to the expedition, after John B. Thomson, now Birch Creek.], which force the Gravvel Stone from the hills in to the river.    we Came 21 1/2 miles & Camped in a bottom of the river on the N.S. [Near Judith Landing Recreation Area and opposite present Dog Creek, the expeditions Bull Creek.]   a large Creek came in on the opposite Shore.   we Saw a gang of Elk in this bottom, & beaver Signs [illegible] the Shores.   a large bottom on the S. Side.   we found an Indians foot ball floating down the river & dog poles also.

May 28, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

This morning we had clear and pleasant Weather, we set off and proceeded on our Voyage towing our Crafts.   we passed some Riffles and Clifts, as those we passed by Yesterday, About 10 oClock A.M. Captain Clark killed a Mountain <Goat> sheep or Ibex, about noon, we halted to dine, near some old Indian Camps, We had some thunder, and small showers of rain which lasted about 2 hours, We then proceeded on, and had a pleasant afternoon, towards evening the hills began to be lower, We proceeded on and passed by large bottoms partly covered with timber, and several Islands some of which had handsome Groves of timber on them, we passed a number of large Creeks, lying on each side of the River, which drove the Gravel into the River   We encamped in a bottom lying on the River on the North side, opposite to the Mouth of a large Creek where we saw a Gang of Elk in the bottom, and signs of beaver on both Shores,--   a large bottom of timber being on the South side of the River, here we found an Indian foot ball floating down the River, and Indian dog poles.--

We came 21 1/2 Miles this day.--